HDP Careers: Art, Literature, Communications, and Marketing

The goals of these professions are to communicate and make available ideas, thoughts, information, or feelings to a mass audience for personal and professional purposes.  This is done through various mediums: television, film, advertising, art, literature, publishing, internet, news, and other forms of mass media.

Relationship to Human Development

All pieces of information and media have a target audience.  Regardless of whether someone is involved in that information or media being created, distributed, or marketed, an understanding of what appeals to that target audience is crucial to getting that information where it needs to go. A broad interdisciplinary understanding of psychology, sociology, and demographics can aid individuals in this process.  Additionally, an understanding of development can help target specific age and social groups.  Moreover, in instances where the medium being communicated specifically addresses developmental issues such as maternity, parenting, physical and mental health, or aging, technical and academic knowledge of development becomes essential.

One HDP student, who double majored in Human Development and Computing & the Arts (ICAM), said it best:

“I will learn how to understand the people I will be working with in the future. I would also learn the best way to apply what I have learned … and use them constructively to help students in need, ranging from helping them emotionally to helping them in an artistic and academic way.”

 

Training and Credentialing

Careers in this field are some of the most competitive and qualified applicants generally outnumber job openings. A wide range of educational backgrounds is suitable for many of these positions.  The ability to communicate well is essential.  For entry into advertising, marketing, promotions, and public relations, many employers prefer those with experience in related occupations plus a broad liberal arts background. A bachelor’s degree in sociology, psychology, literature, journalism, or philosophy, among other subjects, is acceptable.  A college degree generally is required for a position as a writer or editor. Although some employers look for a broad liberal arts background, most prefer to hire people with degrees in communications, journalism, or English. For those who specialize in a particular area of literature or technical writing, additional background or a degree in a specialized field (such as health, law, medicine, child development, children’s literature, etc.) is expected.  Postsecondary training is recommended for all artist specialties. Although formal training is not strictly required, it is very difficult to become skilled enough to make a living without some formal training in fine or graphic arts. Employment as an archivist, conservator, or museum curator usually requires graduate education and related work experience. For librarians, a master’s degree in library science (MLS) is necessary for positions in most public, academic, and special libraries and in some school libraries.

Career Descriptions

Writers and Authors

Writers and authors develop written content for advertisements, books, magazines, movie and television scripts, songs, and online publications. Writers and authors work in an office, at home, or wherever else they have access to a computer. Most work full time. However, self-employed and freelance writers usually work part time or have variable schedules. About two-thirds were self-employed in 2012. A college degree is generally required for a full-time position as a writer or author. Proficiency with computers is necessary for staying in touch with sources, editors, and other writers while working on assignments. Excellent writing skills are essential.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$55,940 per year Bachelor's degree Slower than average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/writers-and-authors.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about writers and authors, visit
American Grant Writers’ Association
American Society of Journalists and Authors
Association of Writers & Writing Programs
National Association of Science Writers
Society of Professional Journalists
Writers Guild of America, East

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Writers and Authors
Copy Writers
Poets, Lyricists and Creative Writers

Editors

Editors plan, review, and revise content for publication. Although most editors work in offices, a growing number work remotely from home. The work can be stressful because editors often have tight deadlines. More than half worked in the publishing industry in 2012. Proficiency with computers and a bachelor’s degree in communications, journalism, or English is typically required to be an editor.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$53,880 per year Bachelor's degree Little or no change

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/editors.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about editors, visit
American Copy Editors Society
American Society of Magazine Editors
Association of Alternative Newsmedia
Radio and Television Digital News Association

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Editors

Librarians

Librarians help people find information and conduct research for personal and professional use. Their job duties may change based on the type of library they work in, such as public, school, and medical libraries. Librarians work for local government, colleges and universities, companies and elementary and secondary schools. Most work full time, but opportunities for part-time work exist. Most librarians need a master’s degree in library science. Some positions have additional requirements, such as a teaching certificate or a degree in another field.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$55,370 per year Master's degree Slower than average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/librarians.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about librarians, including accredited library education programs, visit
American Library Association

For more information about careers in libraries, visit
Library Careers

For information about medical librarians, visit
Medical Library Association

For information about law librarians, visit
American Association of Law Libraries

For information about many different types of special librarians, visit
Special Libraries Association

For more information about school librarians, visit
School Library Monthly

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Librarians

Archivists, Curators, and Museum Technicians

Archivists appraise, edit, and maintain permanent records and historically valuable documents. Curators oversee collections of artwork and historic items, and may conduct public service activities for an institution. Museum technicians and conservators prepare and restore objects and documents in museum collections and exhibits. Archivists work in archives and libraries. Most curators work at museums, zoos, aquariums, botanical gardens, and historical sites. Museum technicians work in museums, while conservators mostly work in laboratories. Most archivist, curator, and conservator positions require a master’s degree related to the field in which they work. People often gain experience by working or volunteering in archives and museums. Museum technicians must have a bachelor’s degree.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$44,410 per year Masters's degree as fast as average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/education-training-and-library/curators-museum-technicians-and-conservators.htm

Trade Organizations:
For information on archivists and on schools offering courses in archival studies, visit
Society of American Archivists

For information about archivists and archivist certification, visit
Academy of Certified Archivists

For information about government archivists, visit
Council of State Archivists

For more information about museum careers, including schools offering courses in museum studies for curators and museum technicians, visit
American Alliance of Museums

For more information about careers and education programs in conservation and preservation for conservators, visit
American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works

For information on job openings as curators, museum technicians, and conservators with the federal government, visit
USAJobs

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Curators
Museum Technicians and Conservators
Archivists

Graphic Media & Design

Graphic designers create visual concepts, by hand or using computer software, to communicate ideas that inspire, inform, or captivate consumers. They develop the overall layout and production design for advertisements, brochures, magazines, and corporate reports. Many of these workers are employed in specialized design services, publishing, or advertising, public relations, and related services industries. In 2012, about 24 percent of graphic designers were self-employed. Graphic designers usually need a bachelor’s degree in graphic design or a related field. Candidates for graphic design positions should demonstrate their creativity and originality through a professional portfolio that features their best designs.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$44,150 per year Bachelor's degree Slower than average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/arts-and-design/graphic-designers.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about graphic design, visit
AIGA
Graphic Artists Guild

For more information about art and design and a list of accredited college-level programs, visit
National Association of Schools of Art and Design

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Graphic Designers

Public Relations Specialists

Public relations specialists create and maintain a favorable public image for the organization they represent. They design media releases to shape public perception of their organization and to increase awareness of its work and goals. Public relations specialists usually work in offices. Some attend community activities. Long workdays are common, as is overtime. Public relations specialists typically need a bachelor’s degree in public relations, journalism, communications, English, or business.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$54,170 per year Bachelor's degree as fast as average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook: Public Relations Specialist
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/public-relations-specialists.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about public relations managers, including professional certification in public relations, visit
Public Relations Society of America
Public Relations Student Society of America
International Association of Business Communicators

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Public Relations Specialists

Public Relations Managers

Public relations managers plan and direct the creation of material that will maintain or enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization. Public relations and fundraising managers generally work in offices during regular business hours. However, many must travel to give speeches and meet with individuals who are important to their organization. Many work more than 40 hours per week. Public relations and fundraising managers need at least a bachelor’s degree and some positions may require a master’s degree. Many years of related work experience is also necessary.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$95,450 per year Bachelor's degree as fast as average

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook: Public Relations Managers
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/public-relations-managers.htm

Trade Organizations :
For more information about public relations and fundraising managers, including professional certification in public relations, visit
CFRE International
Public Relations Society of America
International Association of Business Communicators

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Public Relations and Fundraising Managers

Reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts

Reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts inform the public about news and events happening internationally, nationally, and locally. They report the news for newspapers, magazines, websites, television, and radio. Reporters and correspondents spend a lot of time in the field, conducting interviews and investigating stories. The work is often fast paced, with constant demands to meet deadlines and to be the first reporter to publish a news story on a subject. Employers generally prefer workers who have a bachelor’s degree in journalism or communications along with an internship or work experience from a college radio or television station or a newspaper.

Median Salary Minimum Education Level Job Growth outlook
$37,090 per year Bachelor's degree -13% (Decline)

For More Information

US Dept of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook:Reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts
http://www.bls.gov/ooh/media-and-communication/reporters-correspondents-and-broadcast-news-analysts.htm

Trade Organizations:
For more information about broadcast news analysts, visit
National Association of Broadcasters
Radio Television Digital News Association

For more information about careers in journalism and about internships, visit
Dow Jones News Fund
Society of Professional Journalists

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Broadcast News Analysts
Reporters and Correspondents